Realistic bodies and space age backgrounds: Akanksha Jain on her luminous and futuristic 3D artworks

Akanksha Jain’s journey into art was not the most linear path. Born in Mumbai, India, Akanksha began studying fashion communication in college before completing an MA in international business at UofG. She then got a job as a brand visualizer by creating 3D environments for projects in the field of branding, which at the same time set her up for a career in the digital sphere.

Now she specializes in brand development, graphic design and visual content creation for customers in the gaming, fashion, retail and FMCH industries, respectively. “Digital art is where I see a healthy opportunity for me to realize the full potential of my creative directional skills,” she says. “It binds my passion for fashion, photography, film, sci-fi, architecture, art direction together, and this knowledge informs my ideas while I create art.”

© Akanksha Jain



© Akanksha Jain

© Akanksha Jain



© Akanksha Jain

© Akanksha Jain



© Akanksha Jain

From animation, NFTs to web design and identities, Akanksha’s portfolio is broad and varied as she spends her time switching between commissioned and personalized works. But what binds it all together is the artist’s love of the digital plus a deep ability to master the 3D environment, which allows her to build realistic bodies, space age backgrounds and glittering textures covered in psychedelic colors. “Paying attention to the intricate details of my works of art, which revolve around identity, space and emotions, is an extremely pleasing process for me,” she explains of the themes addressed through her works. Beforehand, Akanksha used storytelling techniques to build his stunning landscapes. Yet she has recently steered more toward “powerful digital fashion moments,” often inspired by her style.

With this in mind, the garments in her artwork tend to take center stage – from see-through, luminous blazers to metallic bodysuits, shades and iridescent headgear. But just as much, the narrative and the intention of the work are just as important as the clothes, especially when it comes to representation in art. As a POC, I have felt a lack of resources to create realistic POC 3D human models, which is why I consciously choose to create and highlight POC in my art. I would like to explore more inclusive body types once I have learned to shape a wider range of body shapes. “

© Akanksha Jain



© Akanksha Jain

© Akanksha Jain



© Akanksha Jain

© Akanksha Jain



© Akanksha Jain

In one of her most recent works, Akanksha has created a portrait called Future Rani. She loves this piece because she decided to style the model with traditional Indian jewelry, paired with hair accessories and garments sourced from the future. “Bringing sci-fi themes together with traditional Indian visual identities seems very exciting to me,” she adds. Another piece titled All Women All Queens delivers a similar case of dystopian skill. Selected as part of the Sevens Foundation’s Empowered Women grant, the animated NFT artwork was created as a “sense of strong ally that transcends domains of power, sexuality, and identity.” The motifs pose in a garden with rosentines in this work, where a technology, tiara and luminous bodies adorn the frame.

In the coming months, Akanksha will continue to work on her low-poly game, which will be relatively different from her usual 3D projects. In addition, she is working on an IP for an upcoming music festival and plans to dive deeper into the world of 3D fashion, all the while hoping to create AR-enabled 3D garments and experiments. There is much more to come from this budding artist. “When someone sees art, I want them to be able to relate to it in their own distinctive way,” she concludes. “By relating to the identity of the human figure, or by associating with a moment in time encapsulated in the surrealistic landscapes. I hope they enjoy consuming it as much as I did.”

© Akanksha Jain



© Akanksha Jain

© Akanksha Jain



© Akanksha Jain

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