First thing: Trump plans to sue for keeping Capitol attack secrets secret | American news

Good morning.

Donald Trump is preparing to sue for blocking the release of White House records from his administration to the committee of inquiry investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol by claiming executive privilege.

Trump’s move to try to oppose the committee, which is informed by a source familiar with his planning, is likely to lead to constitutional clashes in court that would test the power of congressional regulators over the executive branch.

The former president said in recent days that he would refer to the executive privilege of opposing selected House investigators who tried to force his top assistants to testify around January 6, and what he knew about plans to stop the certification of Joe Biden’s election victory.

But the sharpening contours of Trump’s intention to wall the select committee mark a new turning point as he seeks to keep track of the rapidly escalating investigation into the events of Jan. 6, which left five dead and about 140 others wounded.

  • The former president is also expecting top assistants Mark Meadows, Dan Scavino, Steve Bannon and Kash Patel to defy select committees subpoenas for records and testimony.

  • Trump is not guaranteed to win in cases of executive privilege, as he is no longer president, but the plan may delay – and therefore hamper – House select committee investigators.

The United States’ Afghanistan is withdrawing as a ‘logistical success but strategic failure’, Milley said

Gen Mark Milley at the hearing, which became a death knell after the 20-year war that preceded the US departure from Afghanistan.
Gen Mark Milley at the hearing, which became a death knell after the 20-year war that preceded the US departure from Afghanistan. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times / Rex / Shutterstock

The withdrawal from Afghanistan and the evacuation of Kabul were “a logistical success, but a strategic failure,” the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff told the Senate.

Gen. Mark Milley gave the sharp assessment at an extraordinary hearing in the Senate Armed Services Committee held to investigate the US departure, which also became a postmortem on the 20-year war that preceded it.

Milley appeared with Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin and the head of the U.S. Central Command, General Kenneth “Frank” McKenzie, in the most intense, fierce cross-examination of the country’s military leadership in more than a decade.

“It is obvious that the war in Afghanistan did not end on the terms we wanted,” Milley said, noting “the Taliban are now in power in Kabul.”

  • Will Milley resign? He stubbornly rejected a proposal by Republican Senator Tom Cotton that he resign.

  • Why were the Republicans so hostile? A new book, Peril, claims that Milley deliberately tried to undermine Trump’s authority for fear that he would start a foreign war to distract attention from his election loss.

  • What did he say about that? He defended himself, saying: “My loyalty to this nation, its people and the Constitution has not changed and will never change.”

Judge to consider requests to dismiss Britney Spears’ conservatory today

Fans of Britney Spears gather during a rally to protest against the conservatory on July 14th.
Fans of Britney Spears gather during a rally to protest against the conservatory on July 14th. Photo: Mario Anzuoni / Reuters

The Britney Spears Conservatory is on its way back to court for a high-profile hearing today, where a judge will consider requests to remove her father as the authority over her estate and completely end the legal arrangement.

The much-anticipated hearing comes days after a new documentary alleged that Britney Spears’ father, Jamie Spears, and a security team he hired monitored the singer’s private communications and secretly recorded in her bedroom.

Judge Brenda Penny will consider whether Jamie’s role as curator of the singer’s property should end at the Los Angeles court hearing, which is expected to attract a large crowd of fans.

The pop star, whose personal life and finances have been controlled by the controversial legal event for 13 years, has asked the court to remove her father from the event.

  • Spears has for many years strongly objected to the conservatory, records have revealed, but she spoke publicly for the first time in court in June.

  • The court found that Spears has also been denied access to his own money, and was limited to a weekly allowance.

  • Her medical care is controlled by an authorized conservator, who has also supported the singer’s request to remove her father.

In other news …

Elizabeth Warren
Warren said Powell had been ‘lucky’ that banks had so far been able to avoid significant problems. Photo: Stefani Reynolds / AP
  • Senator Elizabeth Warren called the chairman of the Federal Reserve, Jerome Powell, “A Dangerous Man” on Tuesday and promised to oppose his renomination. Warren said that under Powell, the Fed had diluted banking rules after the financial crisis and weakened the U.S. banking system.

  • Canada granted asylum to four people who hid former NSA entrepreneur Edward Snowden in their small Hong Kong apartments when he was on the run after stealing a crowd of classified documents. The non-profit organization For the Refugees calls on Ottawa to speed up asylum for a remaining ‘guardian angel’.

  • Democrats are on the verge of a make-or-break moment that will decide the fate of Biden’s ambitious economic agenda as they rush to build a bridge between the internal divisions that threaten to derail the passage of the comprehensive social policy package and a smaller infrastructure bill.

  • Fumio Kishida, a former foreign minister with a reputation as a consensus builder, is to become Prime Minister of Japan after winning the ruling Liberal Democratic Party’s presidential election in a run – off against Vaccination Minister Taro Kono.

Today’s statistics: 200,000 people must be thrown out of Fort Bend county as Republicans search to redraw constituencies

Fort Bend Democratic chair Cynthia Ginyard on the exploration trail.
Fort Bend Democratic chair Cynthia Ginyard on the exploration trail. Photo: Reggie Mathalone / The Guardian

After winning key state legislative races last year, Republicans have perhaps the most powerful weapon in American politics – the ability to redesign constituencies. It is an almighty scalpel that enables Republicans to increase their advantage by simply gathering voters in certain districts and anchoring white voters’ votes in the midst of a rapidly diversifying voter. The technique of distorting district lines for partial benefit is called gerrymandering. In Fort Bend County, it can be particularly brutal, and Republicans drawing it again will have to evict about 200,000 people from its borders.

Do not miss this: Dita Von Teese on boundaries and how #MeToo changed her

Von Teese: 'I'm not wearing short skirts.  I'm not an exhibitionist!  '
Von Teese: ‘I’m not wearing short skirts. I’m not an exhibitionist! ‘ Photo: CBS Photo Archive / CBS / Getty Images

Only by knowing Dita Von Teese from her femme fatale image, her teasing secluded burlesque performances and her time in the tabloids as the former wife of goth rocker Marilyn Manson, can you expect an ice-cold demeanor, an impenetrable mystery. So that was surprising for Guardian writer Lyndsey Winship to discover how normal she is: talkative, self-explanatory, not very vampig. It’s easy to see traces of Heather Sweet, the “super shy” girl from small-town Michigan who turned into Von Teese when she moved to California in her late teens.

Climate check: record donation of $ 5 billion. to protect nature can herald a new green era of giving

Pumalin Park in southern Chile was given to the Chilean state by the late Douglas Tompkins, a philanthropist and co-founder of The North Face, who bought vast areas of Patagonia.
Pumalin Park in southern Chile was given to the Chilean state by the late Douglas Tompkins, a philanthropist and co-founder of The North Face, who bought vast areas of Patagonia. Photo: Carlos Quezada / AP

Last week, a group of nine philanthropic foundations made the largest donation ever for nature conservation, promising $ 5 billion. To fund the protection of 30% of the planet’s land and sea before the end of the decade. Swiss businessman Hansjörg Wyss, also a major donor to the American Democratic Party, and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos were among the billionaires behind the Protecting our Planet challenge. In fact, the money covers the estimated cost of the 30% target for this decade, one of the 21 targets included in the draft Paris-style UN agreement on nature currently being negotiated.

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Last thing: Danish artist delivers empty frames for $ 84, 000 in protest of low wages

An empty frame from Take the Money and Run by the Danish artist Jens Haaning.  'The job is that I have taken their money,' says Haaning.
An empty frame from Take the Money and Run by the Danish artist Jens Haaning. ‘The job is that I have taken their money,’ says Haaning. Photo: Henning Bagger / EPA

In an unexpected reinterpretation of a previous work, a Danish artist has left a museum with an empty frame, an exhausted bank account and red faces all around. The Art Museum of Modern Art in Northern Denmark provided Jens Haaning, who uses banknotes in his art, with DKK 534,000. From his reserves for the works of art and an artist’s fee of DKK 25,000 (approx. $ 3,900). But when staff unpacked the works last week, they found two empty frames titled Take the Money and Run. “The work is that I have taken their money,” he told Danish radio. “It is not theft. It is a breach of contract and breach of contract is part of the work. ”

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